GRIMSRUD FAMILY HISTORY
                   WRITTEN BY JOHN M. GRIMSRUD
                                     
In many ways, it seems like a very long time ago and in many ways, it was.
I still have an indelible mental image of Grandpa, Christ, “C.C.” Grimsrud leaning back in his big gray
stuffed easy chair after dinner with a far-off look in his eyes as he spoke of the “Old Country”.
My young interest was perked and my curiosity was stirred as my mind searched for answers.
Where was this Old Country?
What was this Old Country?
Who lived in this Old Country?

Though the questions went unanswered, they remained alive and my curiosity haunted my dreams throughout my life.
By and by Grandpa passed away but that seed of curiosity he planted continued to live on in my mind until one day
when I was a middle-aged person I just had to find out about the “Old Country”.
How ironic it all is now looking back over those years. As I write these words, I realize that I am now at the age of 64
about the same age that Grandpa Christ was when he perked my curiosity back in the early 1940s with his talk about
the Old Country.

My first trip to the Old Country happened back in 1983. I had the time and money so all I lacked were the contacts.
A second cousin of mine named Dee Grimsrud had contacted me in her search for Grimsrud family information while
researching the family tree. I was surprised how very little I actually knew about the family history. However, in
corresponding with Dee she put me in contact with the Grimsruds in the Old Country.
Next I sent off a letter to Kari Hoven, who I had met when she visited in America and spent one year in 1948 with
Grimsrud relatives in the Superior, Wisconsin area.

Kari turned out to be the very best person to correspond with because of her incredible aptitude to recall names,
people, places and dates plus she has an incredibly exuberant enthusiasm. (I was amazed at the family resemblance
that Kari had to my father…they could have been twins.)

It turned out that Kari remembered me, my parents and every detail of her visit to America, (the New Country), in vivid
details. She still had a photo of my little brother and me from her 1948 visit.
My wife Jane and I spent six weeks in Norway in 1983 and got to hear countless stories told by my relatives who Kari
made sure we had the opportunity to meet. We were with different groups morning, noon and night every day and the
quantity of coffee and open-faced Norwegian sandwiches we consumed was unfathomable. We took notes, kept a
logbook and took photos of nearly everyone we met and their homes.

The ocean and the distance that separated the Old Country and the New Country in those days after Grandpa Christ
left were more than enormous. If you consider this, I was the very first of all of my grandfather’s direct descendants to
make a trip back to the Old Country. Grandpa Christ left in 1896 and it wasn’t until 1983 that I set foot upon the rock
bound coast of Norway, the Old Country.

Kari and her family presented Jane and I with two very valuable books as souvenirs of our visit for researching the
family history and they are: SKOGERBOKEN, 662 pages and SANDEBOKA, 867 pages. (The books are each
compendiums of the local history of the towns of Skoger and Sande where the Grimsruds settled and raised their
families. They are well illustrated and filled with facts, all written in Norwegian.)
So, thank you so very much Kari and family for these treasures!




























     1983 visit: John M. Grimsrud, Kari and Olav Hoven at Skoger, Norway
                                             
(In this part of Norway, most of the residents are Grimsruds or closely related to them. The story going around is; the
reason they could not teach the Grimsruds to swim under water is that they could not be taught to keep their mouths
shut!)
                                              
Now it is 21 years later and I now have the time to compile the stories, photos and contributed information I have
received over the years.
Also, to Grandpa Christ C.C. Grimsrud, “wherever you might be many thanks to you for leading me to the “Old
Country”.
                                              
This is an account of my ancestors and the people that made up my family:
This name “Grimsrud” was first used by my family in 1841 when my great-great grandfather Peder Christophersen and
his wife Anne Beathe Andersdatter Skot of Dalen moved to the “Grimsrud Farm” located at Skoger which is a small
town 10 kilometers (one Norwegian mile) west of the city of Drammen at the headwaters of the Drammen Fjord that
connects to the Oslo Fjord in southeastern Norway.

Grimsrud Name
Grimsruds are the descendants of the proud Norse Vikings, amongst whom the name "Grim" was quite common.
Fabled amongst them was the fierce Skalla-Grim", whose exploits are described in the Chronicles of the Viking.
Grim is in fact old Germanic meaning fierce.  Although I haven't check it, I am sure that there are a number of localities
in Norway with Grim as a noun, a prefix, or a suffix.

As to "Rud", also spelled in a variant Norwegian tongue as "Rød", it simply means a manmade clearance, whether in
the forest, a hill, a plain or whatever.  Plenty of Norwegian names of places and families have the "rud" as a name or a
suffix.

The best known "rud" in the States is the fabled Norwegian-American engineer Ejvind Rud, inventor of the outboard
engines for boats.  His name was, of course, changed in the United States to Evinrud", which is the present brand of
the outboard engines still being marketed today.

                                                
                  ***
I will begin this interesting story
with my two very interesting ancestors; Peder Christophersen who was born on
the 9th of March in the year 1800 in the region of Vestfold, Norway and his wife
Anne Beathe Andersdatter Skot of
Dalen born the 13th of May in year 1810 on her family farm in the region of Konnerud, Norway.
























   PEDER CHRISTOPHERSEN (GRIMSRUD)             ANNE BEATHE ANDERSDATTER
   BORN 1800 VESTFOLD, NORWAY                          SKOT OF DALEN BORN 1810

























Old farm of Peder Christophersen (Per Melen 1800-1869) and Anne Beathe Andersdatter Skot. (This farm
place that belonged to the family of Anne Beathe and she was born here, married and began her family in
this home.)
At Dalen (under Svarterud) Konnerud
This farm house was torn down in 1938 and the barn stood until 1983.

My wife Jane and I were making a visit to Norway in 1983 to visit my family.
On August 23rd while visiting at the home of Kari and her husband Olav Hoven, Kari, my father’s cousin, made
arrangements to visit with Markus Johnsrud, one of our relatives, and then we traveled to the farm place in Konnerud
where our ancestors lived before moving to the “Grimsrud Farm” at Skoger in the 1840s.
When we arrived at the place where this photo was taken, we were surprised that the original family buildings had
recently been torn down and the building lumber was still stacked nearby. As we sat in our camper van discussing the
family history a young woman that lived nearby came and overheard our conversation. She said that she had
something that might be of interest to us and returned with this photo in a neatly kept frame.
I have kept this photo and over the years it has inspired me to look into the interesting life and travels of Anne Beathe
Andersdatter Skott Grimsrud. She was the first of my ancestors to take the name “Grimsrud”
                                           
Peder and Anne Beathe were married the 9th of March 1827 and resided at the family farm in Konnerud of the then
seventeen-year-old Anne Beathe where they proceeded to have four children.
You will soon meet all of these people, the
children of Peder and Anne Beathe, in the upcoming pages; Inger
Gurine,
born 10 June 1827, Christopher Pedersen (my great grandfather) born 5 August 1829, Andrine Olava
born 21 August 1835 and Anders born 2  January 1839. (These four children were all born at the family farm
in Konnerud.)
                                          
In 1841
Peder Christophersen and Anne Beathe moved to the Grimsrud farm at Skoger and first began using the
Grimsrud name. In the intervening years between first living at  Dalen and then Skoger, they briefly lived at another
farm named Melen, where Peder was then known as “Per Melen” and if they wouldn’t have moved on to the Grimsrud
farm my family name would now be called “Melen”.
                                       
A LETTER CONTRIBUTED BY TRYGVE TRONDSEN RELATING TO THE GRIMSRUD FAMILY AND THEIR HISTORY;
I was not aware that Kristoffer Pedersen Grimsrud, b. 1829 had brothers
and sisters that went to America. And perhaps other relatives that took off?
In 1841 their father Peder Kristoffersen bought Grimsrud farm and I
believed moved there. In 1864 his son took over the farm.
I believe that Peder took the name when he moved to Grimsrud? I have
seen the name Grimsrud (Grimsrud brenna) on the map over Konnerud, where he came from. Is there any
connection between the name Grimsrud at Konnerud and the family name, do you think? Did the children
of Peder who left for America use Grimsrud as a family name? When it was a name at Konnerud called
"Grimsrud-brenna") one would believe that it had something to do with Peders family?
After Peder left Grimsrud farm he moved back to Melen in Skoger which
is very close to Konnerud? Perhaps "Grimsrud-brenna" is named after him then?
The name "brenna" as I would guess means "burning down", cutting trees
perhaps for making new farmland or getting wood for warming houses, or
just woodland burning, I just guess.
It is not important at all; these thoughts just crossed my mind while reading about Grimsrud farm.
(A note about the spelling of Kristoffer and Kristoffersen.  Many times they are spelled Christopher and
Cristophersen and if that gets confusing later you will see how the family names changed and evolved
with the Grimsruds that came to America.)

                                          
Note: This farm has had the name Grimsrud since 1619 although with different spellings; (Gremmsru,
Grimssroed, Grimsrød,  and Grimsrøed. “Grim” is a mans first name and “rud” means the place. People
that lived and worked on the farm also took the Grimsrud name as their surname. There are three
different Grimsrud farms in Norway, but the one in Skoger is the one to which my family belongs.
(NOTE; THE FOLLOWING WAS CONTRIBUTED BY GEORGE GRIMSRUD FROM JANESVILLE, WISCONSIN, U.S.A.
email; ggrim@interaccess.com)
“I liked the various spellings of Grimsrud.  You've done a terrific job.  As for the origin of the name, I
visited a relative on the Dyrud side of our family, Matthias Dotsetsvien, several years ago.  He said that
"rud" meant a clearing in the woods.  "Svien" is a subdivision of a farm.  Therefore, "Grimsrud" is a very
old name, which means the original farm on woods owned by Grim, while Dotsetsvien is a more recent
name, carved out of the original Dotsetrud.”


















1983 Grimsrud farm east (in foreground) is the original farm site and home of Svein Arne Grimsrud. In the
background is the Grimsrud farm west and home of Harald and Rita Grimsrud.
The Grimsrud farm was actually
divided into two parts in 1906’ house and all for the two brothers Otto born 1874 and Anders born 1871.

Peder and Anne had two more children and they were born on the Grimsrud farm. They were Johan Hartvig
born the 9th of March 1843 (he was the first of my ancestors to be born with the Grimsrud name), and on the 18th of
January 1846 they had their sixth child
Olaus.
                                           
In 1864
Peder and Anne left the Grimsrud farm and moved to a farm named Melen. They turned the Grimsrud farm
over to their oldest son,
Christopher (some places spelled with a “K”) Pedersen Grimsrud, (my great
grandfather)
who went on to have 13 children there on the Grimsrud farm.

Peder died the 7th of April 1869 and in 1870 his widow Anne moved to America in order to help her fourth son
Anders, born 1839, raise his four young children.
Anders wife, Karen Antonette Christondatter Grytebakke had just settled in Atwater, Minnesota, when she was struck
by lightning and killed while cooking on her wood burning kitchen stove. That was the 23rd of July 1870.
























This is the grave marker of Karen Antonete Grimsrud located at Atwater, Minnesota in America. She had the
distinction of being the first person buried at this cemetery which was at the time a wild frontier town of the Midwestern
prairies.
After Anne arrived in America she moved with her son Anders to Milnor, North Dakota, (North Dakota was then a state
of only 2400 persons, mostly Norwegians.)
Anne died in 1882 at Willmar, Minnesota.
                                            
(Note; spelling of the name Christian and Christopher in many places is spelled using  a “K” instead of a
“C”).
                                            

Four of Peder and Anne’s children immigrated to America.
The first was Andrine Olava born 1835 and left for America in 1869. She died in Saint Paul, Minnesota the 26
January 1904.

The second to move to America was
Anders born 1839 who died in Milnor, North Dakota on the 4th of January 1888.

The third of their children to move to America was
Johan Hartvig born 1843 who died at Glenwood, Minnesota the
28th of December 1920.

The fourth to move to America was
Olaus born 1845 who died at Starbuck, Minnesota the 18th of April 1920.
Note;
The two children of Peder and Anne to stay in Norway were Inger Gurine who married  Christian
Jorgensen Johnsrud and the other, (my great grand father) Christopher Pedersen, born in 1829 at
Konnerud and moved to Skoger where he lived the rest of  his life on the Grimsrud farm and raised his 13
children there with his wife, Hanna Anette Pettersdatter Egeberg.






































Hanna and Christopher Grimsrud, (my great-grandparents) lived on the Grimsrud farm and raised a family
of 13 children. Christopher is the second of six children of Anne and Peder.
                                           
Before going on to expand upon Anne and Peder’s six children’s lives I will tell what little I know of their life around their
farm and Skoger;
(Below are various photos of the Grimsrud farm and surrounding area).


























             GRIMSRUD FARM, VIEW FROM ROAD LOOKING EAST.
























VIEW OF GRIMSRUD FARM FROM THE OLD SKOGER CHURCH LOOKING SOUTH INTO THE VALLEY. THE
FARM IS APPROXIMATELY ONE KILOMETER FROM THE CHURCH



























GRIMSRUD FAMILY FARM HOUSE; THE OWNER SVEIN ARNE GRIMSRUD HIS WIFE JORAN, DAUGHTERS
HELLE AND WENCHE & JANE GRIMSRUD
This is the original Grimsrud family home where Peder and Anne moved in 1841. The building is made of log
construction and sided over with boards. This building was set afire in 1894 or 1895 when the barn was totally
destroyed. Svein Arne showed us some of the fire damage and also a tree in their front yard that was still living that
had burn damage from that fire. It so happens that my grandfather Christian C.C. 1879 and his older brother Hans
1877 were home with a hired hand when the barn fire was set.
(I have written about that barn fire and the subsequent immigration of Hans and Christian C.C. to America in 1895
under the life story of my grandfather “Christian C.C. Grimsrud” later on in this family history.)














  THIS IS COPIED FROM THE “SANDE BOOK” BY TRYGVE TRONDSEN






















GRIMSRUD FARM WEST: The old lady in the photo is Hanna Anette Pettersdater Egeberg born in 1842 died
in 1920, (my great grandmother) and she was the mother of 13 children all raised on the Grimsrud Farm
east. She moved to the Grimsrud Farm west after her husband Christopher died in 1908.













        THIS IS COPIED FROM THE SANDE BOOK
BY TRYGVE TRONDSEN.
                                         
The nearest city of consequence for shopping was Drammen, which is a deep-water seaport at the headwaters of the
Drammen Fjord surrounded by high rolling rocky hills with a busy commercial port, docks and many light industries.  A
claim to fame is the oldest brewery in Norway, (AASS Bryggeri, Drammen Norges Eldste Bryggeri established in 1834)
and also a distiller of notable quality Aquavit.
(City and harbor photos of Drammen.)



















AT THE HEAD WATERS OF THE DRAMMEN FJORD, THIS IS THE PORT OF DRAMMEN LOOKING
SOUTHWESTERLY. SKOGER AND THE GRIMSRUD FARM ARE LOCATED ACROSS DRAMMEN HARBOR AND
AROUND BEHIND THE HILL ON THE RIGHT SIDE IN THIS PHOTO. (ONE NORWEGIAN MILE OR TEN
KILOMETERS.)

Drammen:
The rock bound coast of Nordic Norway is the home of the Vikings that plied these waters to launch their
far-flung expeditions across Asia, Europe and the Atlantic to America as kings of the seas more than a thousand years
ago.
All that remains today to remind us of those sea-going ancestors are the petroglyphs carved into stone upon the hills
surrounding Drammen depicting their sailing ships and their gods of old.
Also to be found are the well-preserved Viking ships excavated from the burial grounds throughout Scandinavia and
other parts of Northern Europe.
A visit to the Viking Museum in nearby Oslo is necessary to observe first hand the masterful workmanship and loving
attention to detail our forefathers lavished on their watercraft.
Since those days of old when my Viking ancestors made the hills and surrounding mountains of Drammen their home
and the waters their open highway to the world Drammen has continued over all these years to prosper in its own quiet
and measured way.
                                          

In their rural farm town of Skoger the family church of Peder and Anne dated back to the Viking times. The Old
Skoger Church was built in the 1100s with stacked stone walls nearly five feet thick and many relics’ centuries old.
These include oil paintings of Saint Olav when Norway was still Catholic before the arrival of Lutheranism in the mid-
1500s, a hand powered pipe organ, (the oldest in Norway and installed in 1825), and an ornate Crucifix 800 years old  
that is identical to one found in Westminster Abbey in London, England.
(Below are photos of church inside and out, plus grave markers of Grimsrud)
























OLD SKOGER CHURCH STILL IN USE AFTER OVER 900 YEARS.
























OLD SKOGER CHURCH AND ADJACENT GRAVE YARD. AN INTERESTING THING OF NOTE CONCERNING THE
GRAVE YARD. ONE WOULD THINK THAT AFTER 900 CONTINUOUS YEARS OF BURIALS THAT THE GRAVE
YARD WOULD BE VERY EXTENSIVE. WELL, A PRACTICE THAT IS ALMOST UNIVERSAL THROUGHOUT THIS
PART OF THE WORLD IS THAT BURIAL PLOTS ARE ONLY RENTED FROM THE CHURCH FOR A CERTAIN
NUMBER OF YEARS. AFTER THAT TIME HAS PASSED IF NOBODY COMES FORWARD TO PAY FOR ANOTHER
PERIOD OF TIME THE GRAVE IS VACATED, THE STONE MARKER REMOVED AND THE PLOT IS READY FOR A
PAYING CUSTOMER. IN THE ABOVE PHOTO YOU WILL NOTE THE WALL OF DISCARDED HEAD STONES
AROUND THE GRAVE YARD.














JOHN M. GRIMSRUD IN 1983 NEXT TO THE ONLY GRAVE MARKER AT THE OLD SKOGER CHURCH
BELONGING TO THE FAMILY HANEVOLD WITH THE INSCRIPTION OF THE GRIMSRUD FAMILY.
Because of the location of the Grimsrud farm, it fell within the jurisdiction of the church at Sande, Norway, which is
situated south and further away from their farm.
The family attended the old Skoger church first but later on switched to Sande where most of the Grimsruds were
baptized, confirmed, married and buried.



















                     SANDE CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD.






THIS IS ONE OF MANY GRAVE MARKERS AT THE
SANDE CHURCH BUT THIS ONE IS SIGNIFICANT
BECAUSE IT IS THE PLOT WHERE PREVIOUSLY
CHRISTOPHER BORN 1829 AND HIS WIFE HANNA
ANETTE BORN 1842 WERE BURIED. (THEY WERE
MY GREAT GRANDPARENTS AND CHRISTOPHER
WAS THE SECOND CHILD OF PEDER BORN 1800.)













My wife Jane and I have walked from the Grimsrud farm to both of these churches. This route was the way first used by
my Grimsrud family ancestors as they walked to the old Skoger church. My wife Jane and I were surprised to find that
the pathway was nearly blocked off by the encroachment of neighborhood farming in 1983. It was interesting to walk
those very same routes, as I am sure most of the family often had done so many long years ago.





THIS IS THE GRIMSRUD FAMILY BIBLE THAT
CONTAINS THE HAND WRITTEN NAMES AND BIRTH
DATES OF THE 13 CHILDREN OF CHRISTOPHER
BORN 1829 AND HIS WIFE HANNA BORN 1842.
(THE GRAND CHILDREN OF PEDER 1800
AND ANNE BEATHE BORN 1810)
COPIED BY TRYGVE TRONDSEN








































ON THE LEFT IS  OPENING PAGE OF THE GRIMSRUD FAMILY BIBLE NOW KEPT AT THE GRIMSRUD FARM
WEST PRESENTLY OWNED BY HARALD AND RITA GRIMSRUD;  ON THE RIGHT  IS THE INSIDE COVER OF THE
GRIMSRUD FAMILY BIBLE WITH THE HAND WRITTEN NAMES AND DATES OF BIRTH OF THE THIRTEEN
CHILDREN OF CHRISTOPHER AND HANNA; COPIED BY TRYGVE TRONDSEN.

                                         
PEDER CHRISTOPHERSEN (GRIMSRUD) 1800, HIS WIFE ANNE BEATHE ANDERSDATTER SKOT
OF DALEN 1810 AND THEIR IMMEDIATE FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN:
(Note; several diagrams of the family tree can be found at the end of this Grimsrud family history, which
will help track the relationship of the various members.)
                                            
So, here are the six children of Peder and Anne and some brief information:
                                             *
1.  Inger Gurine, the first child was born on the family farm of her mother Anne
located in Konnerud the 10th of June 1827.Inger Gurine was married the
14th of February 1851 in Sande, Norway to Christian Jorgensen Johnsrud.
They had eight children all born in Sande and also married there. Their first
child, Mathilde, born in 1851, was the first of the Grimsruds to make the move
to immigrate to America.
Inger Gurine died the 25th of December 1906 and was buried at the family
church in Sande.




                                 Christian Jorgensen Jonsrud  born 10 July 1828, died 16 March 1885 at Sande,  Norway
                                  
husband of Inger Gurine


                                           



























3. Andrine Olava, the third child was born the 21st of August 1835 at the family farm of Anne at Konnerud.
Andrine Olava married Peder Nelson (Hawoold) the 11th of July 1856 at the Sande church and they immigrated to
America in 1869 or 70. They had three children that all died in Norway and two that survived in America.
Andrine Olava died the 26th of January 1904 in Saint Paul, Minnesota.
                                         
4. Anders (A.P.), the fourth child was born the 2nd of January 1839.
Anders married Karen Antonette Christonsdatter Grytebakke the 4th of April 1862 at the family church in Sande,
Norway. For several years they lived across the road from the Grimsrud farm at the “Grytebakke” farm where they had
four children and then they immigrated to live in America.
(I was told by one of Ander’s relatives, George Grimsrud of Evanston, Illinois that in America Anders considered using
the family name Grytebakke but he considered Grytebakke too difficult and then kept the Grimsrud family name.)
Anders and Karen Antonette were some of the very first pioneer residents to settle in Atwater, Minnesota in America.
A tragic incident occurred in July1870 as Karen Antonette was tending their wood burning kitchen stove. A summer
thunderstorm came through and sent a lightning bolt down that instantly killed Karen Antonette and left Anders to care
for their four young children alone.
Considering the times and the incredible logistics problems with travel back in those days on this wild frontier when the
Indian wars were still raging and the only communication was by surface mail, Anders sent for his recently widowed
mother back in Norway, Anne Beathe Andersdatter Skot (Grimsrud).  
Anne Beathe must have been a very brave and courageous woman to make the trip she did to this very isolated
frontier town of Atwater all by herself. Leaving her home in Norway in those days was to say farewell forever to her
family and friends because of the extreme difficulty and duration of such a long trip. Sailing across the Atlantic Ocean
and then taking numerous overland conveyances of transportation that were mostly horse drawn from New York to
western Minnesota was not only extremely long but perilous.
                                           
Karen Antonette was the very first person to be buried at the Atwater, Minnesota cemetery the 23rd of July 1870. My
wife Jane and I have visited this cemetery and it has become somewhat of a local historical attraction.
                                            








































Barn built by John Hartvig Grimsrud in 1916. Photo was taken when he was 72.

6. Olaus born the 18th of January 1845
and baptized at the Sande church was never married.
Olaus immigrated to America and resided in North Dakota and later on to Starbuck, Minnesota, Pope County where he
died the 17th of April 1920. (insert ship papers here)
FROM THE SHIP’S MANIFEST ELLIS ISLAND ARCHIVES
First Name: Olaus Last Name: Grimsrud Ethnicity: Canada-Scand
Last Place of Residence: Kristiania, Norway (Note after 1905 renamed Oslo, Norway. Olaus obviously lived some time
in Canada but I have no positive proof of that.)
Date of Arrival: October 08, 1915
Age at Arrival:  67y    Gender:  M    Marital Status:  S  
Port of Departure: Kristiania, Norway
Manifest Line Number:0001
previously in US in ND 1864 to 1907 born Sande, Norway...heading to family in London, Ont. Canada

THE GRIMSRUD FAMILY HISTORY CONTINUES WITH THE FAMILY OF CHRISTOPHER
PEDERSEN (GRIMSRUD) AND HIS WIFE HANNA ANETTE PETTERSDATTER EGEBERG, WHO
REMAINED IN NORWAY ON THE GRIMSRUD FAM AND RAISED THEIR FAMILY OF 13 CHILDREN
THERE.  PLEASE GO TO THE FOLLOW PAGE FOR THE HISTORY OF THE 13 CHILDREN, ONE
WHO WAS MY GRANDFATHER.      
CLICK HERE TO GO THE THE PAGE.


GRIMSRUD   LIST OF ANCESTORS OF PEDER CHRISTOPHERSEN AND ANNE BEATHE SKOT
                              
Peder Christophersen and Anne Beathe Skot’s parents and grand parents;
                              
(All place names are in Vestfold, Norway except those in the U.S.)
Note; Peder and Anne were the first relatives to use the Grimsrud name when they moved to the Grimsrud farm at
Skoger, Norway in 1841.
                              ***
Peder Christophersen                                    Anne Beathe Skot
Born 9 March, 1800                                         Born 13 May, 1810
                                   At her family (Dalen) farm in Konnerud
Married 9 March, 1827                                     
                                    Died after 1882
                                    At Willmar, Minnesota, USA                    Died 7 April 1869
At Skoger
                             ***
                   Their Parents:
Father of Peder:                                             Father of Anne:
Christopher Olsen                                         Anders Jonsen
Baptized 29th of September 1759                   Beptized 12th of Feburary 1775
Married 18th of July 1787                               Married 2nd of September 1807                              
Died 25th of March 1834                                 Died 7th of October 1835
Mother of Peder:                                             Mother of Anne:
Ingeborg Henningsdtr                                   Gurtrud Maria Olsdtr
Baptized 4th of October 1761                          Baptized 10th of April 1785
Died 2nd of  February 1837                              Died 20th of April 1858 Sande
Paternal grandfather of Peder:                         Paternal grandfather of Anne:
Ole Erickson                                                   Jon Andersen
Born 1733                                                        Born 1744
Maried 1758
Died 1764
Paternal grandmother of Peder:                      Paternal grandmother of Anne:
Siri Andersdtr                                                  Berthe Olsdtr
Born 173?                                                        Born 1743
Died after 1801
Maternal grandfather of Peder:                        Maternal grandfather of Anne:
Henning Peterson                                             Ole Gabrielsen
Born 1736                                                         Born 1729
Married 5th of January 1760                              Married 6th 0f August 1780 Skoger
Died 1813                                                          Died 8th of Janurary 1814
Maternal grandmother of Peder:                       Maternal grandmother of Anne:
Berte Jensdtr                                                      Eli Pedersdr
Born 1724                                                          Born ca. 1750
2. Christopher Pedersen: (my great grandfather), the second child
and first son was born the 5th of August 1829
at the family farm of Anne
Beathe at Konnerud.
Christopher was married the 11th May 1860 to Hanna Anette Pettersdatter
Egeberg at Sande, Norway
Christopher and Hanna lived and raised their 13 children on the Grimsrud
farm at Sande. Five of their children made the move to immigrate to America.
Their second child Martin, born the 24th of July 1862 immigrated to America
and resided first in Minnesota and later in Superior, Wisconsin where he
married Randi Hoff and had four children. Martin was helpful with the
immigration of several of the family members to America including my
grandfather C.C. Christian Grimsrud, the tenth of the thirteen children.
Christopher died in August of 1907 and was buried at the family church in
Sande.
(Note; the old Grimsrud family bible illustrated on previous pages belonged to
these two and records the birth of their 13 children.)

The history of Christopher Pederson, my great grandfather, and his
wife Hanna Anette continues in more detail on the following page.
                              
Click here.
5. Johan Hartvig, born the 9 March 1843 (The first of Peder and
Anne’s children to be born on the Grimsrud farm).


John Hartvig died the 28th of December 1920 at Glenwood, Minnesota
and had no children.
(Note; the spelling change from Johan to John. Many of the Grimsrud
family immigrants to America used different name spelling when
entering America, making application for citizenship and getting
married.)